Feedback

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Your Feedback

We enjoy our work and we strive to provide safe, friendly, high quality care to you and your loved ones

  • Please tell us what we are doing well – Your positive comments are great for our team morale and enthusiasm!
  • Please tell us how we could look after you better – We will strive to enhance and improve our service

How likely are you to recommend our service to friends and family if they needed similar care or treatment?

Your answer will not be traced back to you, and your details will not be passed on to anyone. A friend or family member is welcome to answer the question if you’re unable to.

Friends and Family Test

Overall, how was your experience of our service?
Which surgery are you leaving feedback for?

Friends and Family Test Feedback Results

Hatherton Medical Centre

January 2024
February 2024
FFT HMC March 2024
March 2024
HMC FFT APRIL 24
April 2024
HMC FFT May 2024
May 2024
June 2024
September 2023
October 2023
November 2023
December 2023

Holland Park Surgery

January 2024
February 2024
FFT HP March 2024
March 2024
HP FFT APRIL 24
April 2024
HP FFT May 2024
May 2024
June 2024
April 2023
May 2023
June 2023
July 2023
August 2023
September 2023
October 2023
November 2023
December 2023

Mossley Fields Surgery

January 2024
February 2024
FFT MF March 2024
March 2024
MF FFT APRIL 24
April 2024
MF FFT May 2024
May 2024
June 2024
April 2023
May 2023
June 2023
July 2023
August 2023
September 2023
October 2023
November 2023
December 2023

Broadway Medical Centre

January 2024
February 2024
FFT BMC March 2024
March 2024
BMC FFT APRIL 24
April 2024
BMC FFT May 2024
May 2024
June 2024
April 2023
May 2023
June 2023
July 2023
August 2023
September 2023
October 2023
November 2023
December 2023

Frequent Feedback

Thank you for your feedback on our services, we are listening.

Please see some of the frequent comments we receive below, and some behind the scenes information.

There aren’t enough appointments, and they aren’t available soon enough.

Appointment demand

Demand for appointments has become much greater than capacity and whichever way we manage our appointments, there is simply not enough capacity to be able to see everyone who asks for an appointment.  We do triage requests according to clinical need and urgency.

We are seeing many patients at the practice with complicated conditions, which can take longer to resolve or need repeat regular reviews with a GP. We are also being asked to see more people who actually don’t need to be seen at all. Many minor conditions can safely be dealt with at home or through discussion with your community pharmacist. Long waiting times for hospital outpatient appointments and treatment mean many patients are returning to see us, often multiple times, about conditions for which they have already been referred. Either because their condition is getting worse, or simply to ask us to try to make the hospital work faster, something we cannot do. Related to this, as large amount of work done in secondary care has been given to GPs, and dealing with this takes more time.

New clinical roles within the practice

Sometimes the GP isn’t always the best person for you to see, depending on your current health concern(s). To help you access support more quickly, you may be able to see a Physiotherapist, Pharmacist, Mental Health Practitioner, or an Advanced Nurse Practitioner at the practice. This allows you to receive the right care, from the right person, when you need it.

For information on the different roles within General Practice, please see this booklet.

Our Team

Patients not attending appointments (DNA)

Unfortunately we are still seeing a disappointing number of appointments going to waste, as patients do not turn up for their booked appointment. Please remember to cancel your appointment if you no longer need it. If you don’t cancel your appointment, and choose not to attend, this means we can’t offer your booked time to someone else who needs it.

It will also be marked on your record as a DNA (Did Not Attend). If you have several DNAs, this could result in you being removed from the practice list.

Wasted appointments means unwell patients aren’t able to be seen. Please, help us help you.

Staff sickness

We are still managing significant short and long-term sickness post pandemic. Many of our staff are still contracting COVID-19 and are isolating, and this has an impact on the number of appointments and results in cancelling of appointments.

It takes too long to get through on the phone.

Service demand

Demand for our services has become much greater in recent times, and our reception staff have a very demanding role with a long list of other responsibilities. Our receptionists will answer your calls as quickly as they are able to. If there is a high number of calls into the practice, you might be waiting a little while as our team get through these calls one by one.

We understand it is frustrating if you are waiting a long time to speak to somebody, but sometimes phone calls can be complicated and take some time to help the person calling. Calls like these will understandably delay the time to answer the next call as they take more time.

Peak time

You might be waiting longer at peak times during the day as more patients are trying to contact the practice. The peak time for our phone lines is typically between 8am and 9am.

Staff sickness

We are still managing significant short and long-term sickness post pandemic. Many of our staff are still contracting COVID-19 and are isolating, and this has an impact on the time it takes to answer the phone.

Contact us online

If you need to contact the practice and are finding it difficult to get through on the phone, or don’t have time to wait in the call queue, please consider submitting an online request. You can contact us about a medical, administrative or prescription issue, and will receive a response within 2 working days.

Booking some appointments from your mobile phone

If you’ve received text messages from us for a while, you might notice that they look a bit different now.

We recently changed our provider to Accurx

We understand that these texts might look a bit suspicious, if they ask you to click on a link, but please be assured that these messages are coming from us.

The links in these messages will direct you to a webpage. Depending on the message that was sent to you, you can then respond by answering some questions, providing information, attaching images, or even being able to choose an appointment time from an available list if we have invited you to visit the practice.

Here are some examples of what some of these messages look like:

Staff are unfriendly, or they are not smiling.

Our staff always strive to be friendly and courteous. However, they have very demanding roles and they may be feeling the strain.

Unacceptable and abusive behaviour towards staff

We are also seeing an increase in unacceptable and abusive behaviour from our patients towards our staff. Abuse like this will understandably have an impact on the mood and morale of the staff receiving it, and ultimately result in driving staff away from the practice and will only make the services we provide harder to deliver.
Please understand that we are all human and have feelings, and treat our staff with the kindness and courtesy you would expect from them.

If you believe that our staff are genuinely not meeting your expectations, please feel free to voice your concerns to the practice.

I was kept waiting after my appointment time to be seen.

We understand that it is frustrating when our clinicians run late and keep you waiting.

Patients arriving late

Sometimes patients will arrive late to their appointment, which will have a knock-on effect for the patients booked afterwards. Sometimes this can’t be helped, due to traffic or bad weather. Appointment times are booked in 10-minute intervals. Our clinicians will always do their best to give you the time you need.

Clinicians running behind

If you see other patients arriving and being called in whilst you are still waiting, it is likely that they are booked with a different clinician. Each clinician has their own list of patients booked to see them throughout the day. Some may run to time and others may unfortunately run behind. If you are concerned, please speak to reception and they can check the clinician’s list for you.

Unpredictable emergencies

Due to the nature of our work, occasionally we have unpredictable emergencies, which we must deal with urgently. We ask for your patience in these matters and apologise for any inconvenience caused. One day the person with the emergency could be you!

Patients arriving with multiple health concerns, or asking for relatives to be seen at the same time

A big cause of clinicians running late is patients bringing long lists of problems – or asking for relatives to be seen at the same time.

Please do not bring long lists of ailments and expect the clinician to have time to deal with all of them adequately and safely.
Every consultation needs to be carefully documented in your medical record. For complex cases or patients bringing a list of problems this sometimes takes almost as long as the consultation itself. Your appointment doesn’t end when you leave the consulting room.

Please do not ask for relatives to be seen during your appointment.

The waiting room is empty.

We sometimes receive comments that you are kept waiting in an apparently empty waiting room.

Appointments over the telephone

When you book your appointment, it is your choice whether you would like it to take place in person, or over the telephone. Sometimes the clinicians may have a list of phone calls booked before your face-to-face appointment. Therefore, the number of patients sitting in the waiting room might not accurately reflect the amount of consultations the clinician will carry out that day. Phone calls might also run over due to technical issues or difficulty getting through to a patient.

Other GP responsibilities

The GPs also have other responsibilities alongside speaking to patients regarding health concerns. This includes:

  • Processing the many results received by the practice daily (such as blood tests, scan reports, urine and various other sample results).
  • Processing the many prescription requests and queries submitted to the practice daily.
  • Sending referrals to various hospitals and checking incoming hospital letters.
  • Completing paperwork requested by patients and solicitors (such as medical reports, “doctor’s letters”, and exemption certificates).
  • Visiting housebound patients at their home.
  • Dealing with urgent queries on a daily basis.
  • Supporting the other members of our practice.
  • Dealing with complaints about access and lack of appointments. These have increased significantly, and whilst we appreciate your frustration these do take time to respond to, ironically taking us away from clinical duties

Why do the receptionists ask what’s wrong with me? They’re just being nosey.

The role of receptionists within the GP surgery

It’s not a case of the receptionists being nosey.

The reception staff are members of the practice team and it has been agreed that they should ask patients “why they need to be seen”.

Reception staff are trained to ask certain questions in order to ensure that you receive:

  • The most appropriate medical care,
  • From the most appropriate health care professional,
  • At the most appropriate time.

Receptionists are asked to collect brief information from patients:

  1. To help doctors prioritise house visits and phone calls
  2. To ensure that all patients receive the appropriate level of care
  3. To direct patients to see the nurse or other health professional rather than a doctor where appropriate.

Reception staff, like all members of the team, are bound by confidentiality rules.

  • Any information given by you is treated strictly confidentially
  • The practice would take any breach of confidentiality very seriously and deal with accordingly
  • You can ask to speak to a receptionist in private away from reception
  • However if you feel an issue is very private and do not wish to say what this is then this will be respected

Feedback, Compliments and Complaints

There are three main ways to feedback about your experience of our GP Surgery and the service we provide.

Friends and Family Test

The NHS Friends and Family Test (FFT) was created to help understand whether patients are happy with the service provided, or where improvements are needed. It’s a quick and anonymous way to give your views after receiving NHS care or treatment.

We use the information captured via the Friends and Family Test to improve our service. It is anonymous, so if you would like to discuss your experience, it is better to contact us through our general feedback form.

Feedback and Compliments

We are continually looking to turn your feedback into real improvements in our services. We use it to focus on what matters most to our patients, their carers and their families.

If you want to share your experience or have a suggestion on how we can do things better to improve our patients’ experiences, please complete the below form. We’d also like to hear from you if you are pleased with the service you’ve received. We’ll let the staff involved know and share the good practice across our teams.

If you can’t complete the form or would find it easier to discuss your experience you can contact the surgery by phone.
Please see our contact page for contact numbers and opening hours

Complaints Procedure

We aim to provide patients with the best care we can. If you have any comments, concerns or complaints about our service, we want to hear about it. 

Please choose the surgery you would like to make a complaint to:

Who to complain to:

Complaints should be addressed to Lorraine Stewart, Heidi Hewitt or Lauren Smith, Locality Manager, Hatherton Medical Centre, 1 Hatherton Street, Walsall, WS1 1AF

If patients don’t wish to complain direct to the practice then their route in the first instance should be the Black Country Integrated Care Board. If patients are not happy with their response from the Black Country Integrated Care Board or the practice then the next step is to contact the Health Service Ombudsman. Please see contact details below for the Black Country Integrated Care Board.

Complaint formComplaint Form :: Black Country ICB
Post: Time2Talk, NHS Black Country Integrated Care Board (ICB) Civic Centre, St Peter’s Square, Wolverhampton, WV1 1SH
Websitehttps://blackcountry.icb.nhs.uk/have-your-say/time-2-talk

NHS Choices for complaints to other NHS organisations

Website: www.nhs.uk/nhsengland/complaints

Who can complain?

You can complain about something that has happened to you or about another person’s treatment if they are a child or where a patient has died.

We keep strictly to the rules of medical confidentiality.

Therefore, if you are complaining on behalf of someone who is unable to make their own complaint, we have to know that you have their permission to do so and we will therefore request their permission in writing, unless they are incapable of providing this.

Time limits:

We hope that most problems can be sorted out easily and quickly often at the time they arise and with the person concerned.

If the problem cannot be sorted out in this way and you wish to make a complaint, we would like you to let us know as soon as possible – ideally, within a matter of days or at most a few weeks – because this will enable us to establish what happened more easily.

Usually complaints can only be investigated if they are made:
Within 12 months of the incident that caused the problem; or
Within 12 months of you realising that you have something to complain about

What the Practice will do?

We shall acknowledge your complaint within 3 working days, preferably in writing.

We will agree with you a complaint plan which will include:
– Details of all parties and how they can be contacted.
– The issues that require addressing
– The planned outcomes
– How the matter will be investigated (proportionate to risk)
– The timescale for the investigation and any interim progress reports to be provided to the complainant.
– How the responses will be provided
– What support has been suggested for the complainant
– How the practice will provide follow-up on any action taken as a result of a complaint as a means of continuous improvement.

Next steps – Investigating your complaint:

We will aim to investigate your complaint within the timescale agreed with you initially.

If this is not possible we will update you in writing of the reason for the delay.

When we look into your complaint we shall aim to:
* Find out what happened and what went wrong.
* Make it possible for you to discuss the problem with those concerned, if you wish.
* Make sure you receive an apology, where this is appropriate.
* Identify what we can do to make sure the problem does not happen again.
* We offer a face to face meeting or a written response but not both.

Your rights when making a complaint:

– Have the right to have any complaint you make about NHS Services dealt with efficiently and to have it properly investigated.
– Have the right to know the outcome of any investigation into your complaint.
– Have the right to take your complaint to the Independent Health Service Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman (PHSO), Millbank, Tower London, SW1P 4QP. Ring our complaints Helpline 0345 015 4033 or email phso.enquiries@ombudsman.org.uk Or fax us on 0300 061 4000 if you are not satisfied with the way their complaint has been dealt with by the NHS.
Who to complain to:

Complaints should be addressed to Sabrina Ruffles, Locality Manager, Holland Park Surgery, Park View Centre, Chester Road North, Brownhills, Walsall, WS8 7JB

If patients don’t wish to complain direct to the practice then their route in the first instance should be the Black Country Integrated Care Board. If patients are not happy with their response from the Black Country Integrated Care Board or the practice then the next step is to contact the Health Service Ombudsman. Please see contact details below for the Black Country Integrated Care Board.

Complaint formComplaint Form :: Black Country ICB
Post: Time2Talk, NHS Black Country Integrated Care Board (ICB) Civic Centre, St Peter’s Square, Wolverhampton, WV1 1SH
Websitehttps://blackcountry.icb.nhs.uk/have-your-say/time-2-talk

NHS Choices for complaints to other NHS organisations

Website: www.nhs.uk/nhsengland/complaints

Who can complain?

You can complain about something that has happened to you or about another person’s treatment if they are a child or where a patient has died.

We keep strictly to the rules of medical confidentiality.

Therefore, if you are complaining on behalf of someone who is unable to make their own complaint, we have to know that you have their permission to do so and we will therefore request their permission in writing, unless they are incapable of providing this.

Time limits:

We hope that most problems can be sorted out easily and quickly often at the time they arise and with the person concerned.

If the problem cannot be sorted out in this way and you wish to make a complaint, we would like you to let us know as soon as possible – ideally, within a matter of days or at most a few weeks – because this will enable us to establish what happened more easily.

Usually complaints can only be investigated if they are made:
Within 12 months of the incident that caused the problem; or
Within 12 months of you realising that you have something to complain about

What the Practice will do?

We shall acknowledge your complaint within 3 working days, preferably in writing.

We will agree with you a complaint plan which will include:
– Details of all parties and how they can be contacted.
– The issues that require addressing
– The planned outcomes
– How the matter will be investigated (proportionate to risk)
– The timescale for the investigation and any interim progress reports to be provided to the complainant.
– How the responses will be provided
– What support has been suggested for the complainant
– How the practice will provide follow-up on any action taken as a result of a complaint as a means of continuous improvement.

Next steps – Investigating your complaint:

We will aim to investigate your complaint within the timescale agreed with you initially.

If this is not possible we will update you in writing of the reason for the delay.

When we look into your complaint we shall aim to:
* Find out what happened and what went wrong.
* Make it possible for you to discuss the problem with those concerned, if you wish.
* Make sure you receive an apology, where this is appropriate.
* Identify what we can do to make sure the problem does not happen again.
* We offer a face to face meeting or a written response but not both.

Your rights when making a complaint:

– Have the right to have any complaint you make about NHS Services dealt with efficiently and to have it properly investigated.
– Have the right to know the outcome of any investigation into your complaint.
– Have the right to take your complaint to the Independent Health Service Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman (PHSO), Millbank, Tower London, SW1P 4QP. Ring our complaints Helpline 0345 015 4033 or email phso.enquiries@ombudsman.org.uk Or fax us on 0300 061 4000 if you are not satisfied with the way their complaint has been dealt with by the NHS.
Who to complain to:

Complaints should be addressed to Carly Sutton or Lavina Rani, Locality Manager, Mossley Fields Surgery, Fisher Road, Bloxwich, Walsall, WS3 2TA

If patients don’t wish to complain direct to the practice then their route in the first instance should be the Black Country Integrated Care Board. If patients are not happy with their response from the Black Country Integrated Care Board or the practice then the next step is to contact the Health Service Ombudsman. Please see contact details below for the Black Country Integrated Care Board.

Complaint formComplaint Form :: Black Country ICB
Post: Time2Talk, NHS Black Country Integrated Care Board (ICB) Civic Centre, St Peter’s Square, Wolverhampton, WV1 1SH
Websitehttps://blackcountry.icb.nhs.uk/have-your-say/time-2-talk

NHS Choices for complaints to other NHS organisations

Website: www.nhs.uk/nhsengland/complaints

Who can complain?

You can complain about something that has happened to you or about another person’s treatment if they are a child or where a patient has died.

We keep strictly to the rules of medical confidentiality.

Therefore, if you are complaining on behalf of someone who is unable to make their own complaint, we have to know that you have their permission to do so and we will therefore request their permission in writing, unless they are incapable of providing this.

Time limits:

We hope that most problems can be sorted out easily and quickly often at the time they arise and with the person concerned.

If the problem cannot be sorted out in this way and you wish to make a complaint, we would like you to let us know as soon as possible – ideally, within a matter of days or at most a few weeks – because this will enable us to establish what happened more easily.

Usually complaints can only be investigated if they are made:
Within 12 months of the incident that caused the problem; or
Within 12 months of you realising that you have something to complain about

What the Practice will do?

We shall acknowledge your complaint within 3 working days, preferably in writing.

We will agree with you a complaint plan which will include:
– Details of all parties and how they can be contacted.
– The issues that require addressing
– The planned outcomes
– How the matter will be investigated (proportionate to risk)
– The timescale for the investigation and any interim progress reports to be provided to the complainant.
– How the responses will be provided
– What support has been suggested for the complainant
– How the practice will provide follow-up on any action taken as a result of a complaint as a means of continuous improvement.

Next steps – Investigating your complaint:

We will aim to investigate your complaint within the timescale agreed with you initially.

If this is not possible we will update you in writing of the reason for the delay.

When we look into your complaint we shall aim to:
* Find out what happened and what went wrong.
* Make it possible for you to discuss the problem with those concerned, if you wish.
* Make sure you receive an apology, where this is appropriate.
* Identify what we can do to make sure the problem does not happen again.
* We offer a face to face meeting or a written response but not both.

Your rights when making a complaint:

– Have the right to have any complaint you make about NHS Services dealt with efficiently and to have it properly investigated.
– Have the right to know the outcome of any investigation into your complaint.
– Have the right to take your complaint to the Independent Health Service Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman (PHSO), Millbank, Tower London, SW1P 4QP. Ring our complaints Helpline 0345 015 4033 or email phso.enquiries@ombudsman.org.uk Or fax us on 0300 061 4000 if you are not satisfied with the way their complaint has been dealt with by the NHS.
Who to complain to:

Complaints should be addressed to Kerry Blakemore Locality Manager, Broadway Medical Centre, 213 Broadway, Walsall, WS1 3HD

If patients don’t wish to complain direct to the practice then their route in the first instance should be the Black Country Integrated Care Board. If patients are not happy with their response from the Black Country Integrated Care Board or the practice then the next step is to contact the Health Service Ombudsman. Please see contact details below for the Black Country Integrated Care Board.

Complaint formComplaint Form :: Black Country ICB
Post: Time2Talk, NHS Black Country Integrated Care Board (ICB) Civic Centre, St Peter’s Square, Wolverhampton, WV1 1SH
Websitehttps://blackcountry.icb.nhs.uk/have-your-say/time-2-talk

NHS Choices for complaints to other NHS organisations

Website: www.nhs.uk/nhsengland/complaints

Who can complain?

You can complain about something that has happened to you or about another person’s treatment if they are a child or where a patient has died.

We keep strictly to the rules of medical confidentiality.

Therefore, if you are complaining on behalf of someone who is unable to make their own complaint, we have to know that you have their permission to do so and we will therefore request their permission in writing, unless they are incapable of providing this.

Time limits:

We hope that most problems can be sorted out easily and quickly often at the time they arise and with the person concerned.

If the problem cannot be sorted out in this way and you wish to make a complaint, we would like you to let us know as soon as possible – ideally, within a matter of days or at most a few weeks – because this will enable us to establish what happened more easily.

Usually complaints can only be investigated if they are made:
Within 12 months of the incident that caused the problem; or
Within 12 months of you realising that you have something to complain about

What the Practice will do?

We shall acknowledge your complaint within 3 working days, preferably in writing.

We will agree with you a complaint plan which will include:
– Details of all parties and how they can be contacted.
– The issues that require addressing
– The planned outcomes
– How the matter will be investigated (proportionate to risk)
– The timescale for the investigation and any interim progress reports to be provided to the complainant.
– How the responses will be provided
– What support has been suggested for the complainant
– How the practice will provide follow-up on any action taken as a result of a complaint as a means of continuous improvement.

Next steps – Investigating your complaint:

We will aim to investigate your complaint within the timescale agreed with you initially.

If this is not possible we will update you in writing of the reason for the delay.

When we look into your complaint we shall aim to:
* Find out what happened and what went wrong.
* Make it possible for you to discuss the problem with those concerned, if you wish.
* Make sure you receive an apology, where this is appropriate.
* Identify what we can do to make sure the problem does not happen again.
* We offer a face to face meeting or a written response but not both.

Your rights when making a complaint:

– Have the right to have any complaint you make about NHS Services dealt with efficiently and to have it properly investigated.
– Have the right to know the outcome of any investigation into your complaint.
– Have the right to take your complaint to the Independent Health Service Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman (PHSO), Millbank, Tower London, SW1P 4QP. Ring our complaints Helpline 0345 015 4033 or email phso.enquiries@ombudsman.org.uk Or fax us on 0300 061 4000 if you are not satisfied with the way their complaint has been dealt with by the NHS.